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Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli

Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli

Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, Department of Nursing, University of Haifa


Biography:

Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli is a medical sociologist and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Welfare & Health Sciences at the University of Haifa. Her interests focus on the political and social implications of medical technologies, especially, gender, health and the politics of reproductive medicine. Her research concentrates on reproduction-related issues and the interface of health care and state politics. She has published extensively in major professional journals and is the author of Tel Aviv North: The Making of a New Israeli Middle Class (Hebrew University Press, 2000). She is also the co-editor (with Marcia C. Inhorn) of Assisting Reproduction, Testing Genes: Global Encounters with New Biotechnologies (Berghahn Books, 2009), (co-winner of Most Notable Recent Collection Book Prize for 2012 awarded by the Council on Anthropology and Reproduction) and the co-editor (with Yoram S. Carmeli) of Kin, Gene, Community: Reproductive Technologies among Jewish Isrealis (Berghahn Books, 2010). She received her PhD in Sociology and Anthroplogy from the Hebrew University. Birenbaum-Carmeli's recent research projects concentrate on egg freezing; disassembling same-sex families; comparative quantitative assessments of gestational surrogacy.

Key Publications

MC Inhorn,  D Birenbaum-Carmeli, J Birger, LM Westphal,  J Doyle, N Gleicher, D Meirow, M Dirnfeld, D Seidman, A Kahane, P Patrizio. (2018). Ten Pathways to Elective Egg Freezing: A Binational Analysis, Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

Marcia C. Inhorn, Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli, and Pasquale Patrizio. (2017). Medical Egg Freezing and Cancer Patients' Hopes: Fertility Preservation at the Intersection of Life and Death. Social Science & Medicine, 195:25-33.

Marcia Inhorn, Birenbaum Carmeli, Daphna, Soraya Tremayne and Zeynep Gurtin. (2017). Assisted reproduction and Middle East kinship: a regional and religious comparison, Reproductive BioMedicine and Society Online, 4, 41-51.

Dagan Efrat, Suzi Gatengo-Modiano, Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli. (2016). "My choice": Breast cancer patients recollect doctors' fertility preservation recommendations, Supportive Care in Cancer, 25(8), 2421-2428.

*Birenbaum Carmeli, Daphna. (2016). Thirty Five Years of ART in Israel, Reproductive BioMedicine and Society Online. 2, 16-23.

Birenbaum-Carmeli. D. 2014. Health journalism in the service of power: ‘moral complacency’ and the Hebrew media in the Gaza–Israel conflict, Sociology of Health & Illness36(4), 613–628.

Birenbaum-Carmeli. D. and R. Haimov-Kochman (2010). Fertility treatments under semi/occupation: The case of East Jerusalem, Fact, Views and Vision in Ob/Gyn.

Birenbaum-Carmeli D.  2009. The politics of ‘The Natural Family’ in Israel: State policy and kinship ideologies, Social Science and Medicine, 69, 1018-1024.

Birenbaum-Carmeli. D. and Inhorn Marcia. (2009) Masculinity and Marginality: Palestinian Men's Struggles with Infertility in Israel and Lebanon, Journal of Middle East Women Studies, 5(2), 23-52.

Birenbaum-Carmeli Daphna and Martha Dirnfeld (2008). In Vitro Fertilisation Policy in Israel and Women's Perspectives: The More the Better? Reproductive Health matters, 16(31):182–191.

Inhorn Marcia and D. Birenbaum-Carmeli. (2008) Assisted reproductive technologies and cultural change, Annual Review of Anthropology, 37: 177-196

Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli. (2004). The prevalence of Jews as subjects in genetic research: explanation and potential implications, American Journal of Medical Genetic, 130A(1): 76-83.

Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli. (2004). 'Cheaper than a Newcomer': On the political economy of IVF in Israel, Sociology of Health and Illness, 26(7): 897-924.

 

Changing (In)Fertilities is a major new collaborative interdisciplinary research project funded by the Wellcome Trust and based in the Reproductive Sociology Research Group (ReproSoc) at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Prof. Marcia C. Inhorn of Yale University.

 

We know that IVF and ARTs do not just reproduce babies: they reproduce values, norms, identities and institutions.

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This project is funded by the Wellcome Trust