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Aditya Bharadwaj

Aditya Bharadwaj

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies


Biography:

Aditya Bharadwaj is professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. His principal research interest is in the area of assisted reproductive, genetic, and stem cell biotechnologies and their rapid spread in diverse global locales. In 2013, he was awarded a European Research Council Consolidator Grant to examine the burgeoning rise of stem cell biotechnologies in India. Bharadwaj's work has been published in peer-reviewed journals and he has contributed several chapters to edited collections. He has co-authored Risky Relations: Family and Kinship and the New Genetics (Berg, 2006) and is the lead author of Local Cells, Global Science: The Proliferation of Stem Cell Technologies in India (Routledge, 2009). His sole-authored research monograph is titled Conceptions: Infertility and Procreative Technologies in India (Berghahn, 2016). His most recent book is titled: Global Perspectives on Stem Cell Technologies (Palgrave 2017). 

Key Publications

Global Perspectives on Stem Cell Technologies. Palgrave Macmillan 2017. 

Conceptions: Infertility and Procreative Modernity in India. Berghahn Books, 2016.

Cultivated Cure, Regenerated Affliction: Encounters with ALS and Stem Cell Regeneration in India, 2017, Medicine Anthropology Theory 4, no. 3, Special Section: On Affliction, 143–152; https://doi.org/10.17157/mat.4.3.476.

Experimental Subjectification: The Pursuit of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in India, 2013, Ethnos, Vol. 76, No. 1, pp – 84-107.

Subaltern Biology? Local Biologies, Indian Odysseys and the Pursuit of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Therapies, 2013, Medical Anthropology, Vol. 32, No. 4, pp – 359-73

Ethic of Consensibility, Subaltern Ethicality: The Clinical Application of Embryonic Stem Cells in India, 2013, Biosocities, Vol. 8, pp – 25-40.

Enculturating Cells: Anthropology, Substance, and Science of Stem Cells. Annual Review of Anthropology, 2012, Vol. 41, pp.303-17.

Changing (In)Fertilities is a major new collaborative interdisciplinary research project funded by the Wellcome Trust and based in the Reproductive Sociology Research Group (ReproSoc) at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Prof. Marcia C. Inhorn of Yale University.

 

We know that IVF and ARTs do not just reproduce babies: they reproduce values, norms, identities and institutions.

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This project is funded by the Wellcome Trust